PhD project offered by the IMPRS-gBGC in

" style="display:none">Anchor
" target="_blank"> , " target="_blank"> , " target="_blank">

Project description

The characterization of biogenic gases and their temporal fluctuations is highly important for the elucidation of environmental processes and the interactions with biosphere. Currently there is a lack of miniaturized, field-portable, and robust sensors capable for simultaneous quantification of multiple components in complex biogenic gas mixtures. An innovative approach is Raman gas spectroscopy, a technique that is based on molecular vibrations and capable for the quantification of a whole variety of biogenic gases simultaneously in a broad concentration range (from ppm to pure compounds). Raman spectroscopy is a non-consumptive technique that can be applied for rapid online monitoring of gases.
In this project a new miniaturized and robust Raman gas sensing setup will be developed with very high spectral resolution. Novel optical sensor fibers with elaborate micro-structures will be developed and exploited in order to achieve an improved analytical sensitivity. This novel gas sensing setup will allow extremely precise online quantification of isotopic labeled gases with no cross-sensitivities. Such spectrally highly resolved Raman gas sensing will help for detailed tracing of plant metabolites and thus enables a better investigation of resource flows in mesocosm experiments. Several interdisciplinary gas sensing experiments involving12CO2 / 13CO2, 14N2 / 15N2, and 14N2O / 15N2O will be performed together with our collaboration partners.The new device will be mobile and joint experiments in the labs of other IMPRS partners will be possible.

Working group and planned collaborations

The work in the fiber spectroscopy group at the Institute of Physical Chemistry and the Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology is focused on the development and application of fiber enhanced Raman spectroscopic gas sensing techniques that enable new insights into complex biogeochemical processes.
The interdisciplinary project is strongly connected to the collaborative research centre AquaDiva and includes several collaborations to groups at Max Planck and the Friedrich Schiller University, e.g. Department of Soil Science. The improved capabilities of this new, robust Raman gas sensing device will also be of high importance for AquaDiva.

Requirements

Applications to the IMPRS-gBGC are open to well-motivated and highly-qualified students from all countries. For this particular PhD project we seek a candidate with
  • a Master’s degree in physics, analytical or physical chemistry, engineering, or related disciplines
  • experimental and technical skills and interest in the development and application of new instruments and setups
  • interest in Raman Spectroscopy, fiber optics, and gas sensing
  • interest in environmental and biogeochemical sciences
  • very good oral and written communication skills in English

After you have been selected

The IMPRS-gBGC office will happily assist you with your transition to Jena. The conditions of employment, including upgrades and duration follow the rules of the Max Planck Society for the Advancement of Science and those of the German civil service. The gross monthly income amounts about 2000 EUR, which will cover all your expenses in Germany.
The Max Planck Society seeks to increase the number of women in those areas where they are underrepresented and therefore explicitly encourages women to apply. The Max Planck society is committed to increasing the number of individuals with disabilities in its workforce and therefore encourages applications from such qualified individuals.

(a) Enhanced Raman multigas sensing
– a novel tool for control and
analysis of <sup>13</sup>CO<sub>2</sub> labeling experiments
in environmental research,
Analyst (2014), 139, 16,
3879; (b) Investigation of Gas Exchange
Processes in Peat Bog Ecosystems
by Means of Innovative
Raman Gas Spectroscopy,
Analytical Chemistry (2013), 85,
1295.
(a) Enhanced Raman multigas sensing – a novel tool for control and analysis of 13CO2 labeling experiments in environmental research, Analyst (2014), 139, 16, 3879; (b) Investigation of Gas Exchange Processes in Peat Bog Ecosystems by Means of Innovative Raman Gas Spectroscopy, Analytical Chemistry (2013), 85, 1295.


>> more information about the IMPRS-gBGC + application